Cat vs. Peanut Butter Jar

Tabitha Cain fed feral cat she calls Wild Oats for several years, but now she’s thinking the cat’s name should be Survivor.  That’s because she says the cat survived for 19 days with a peanut butter jar stuck on its head.  “We tried to get her, but being the type of cat you can’t catch, she kept running and hiding,” said Doretha Cain, Tabitha’s mother.

The family saw the cat several times with the jar on its head and tried in vain to catch it. But after not seeing the cat for a week, the Cains feared the worst.  “I thought she was going to die with that jar on her head,” said Tabitha Cain, 25.

They found the once chubby cat Wednesday, too thin and weak to flee. They caught her with a fishing net and used some oil to get the jar off her head.  They gave her water and treated her wounds and Friday she began to eat again.  “I’ve heard of cats having nine lives but I think this one has 19 because she survived 19 days,” Doretha Cain said.

Memphis veterinarian Gerald Blackburn said he’s heard similar stories of pets getting trapped for days or even weeks at a time and surviving. Blackburn said the cat may have lived off of its excess fat.  I am not sure I believe this one because I don’t see how the cat could have recieved liquids?

Find me a Toilet…

A new service promises Londoners they’ll never have to spend much time looking for a place to ‘go’, again.  Westminster City Council, which covers London’s bustling Oxford Street, the West End, Big Ben and the Houses of Parliament, today launched “SatLav” – a toilet-finding service for cell phone users.  It sounds like it is straight out of a Seinfeld episode but it is true.

Tourists, theatregoers, shoppers and pub patrons in London’s West End can now text the word “toilet” – and receive a text back with the address of the nearest public facility.

The system, which covers 40 public toilets, pinpoints the caller’s position by measuring the strength of the phone signal.  The texts cost about 50 cents, and most of Westminster’s toilets are free.

The council said it hopes the service will stop people from urinating in alleyways, saying some 4,500 litres of urine ends up in Westminster streets each year.

Companies such as Vindigo Inc. in the U.S. offers similar cell phone searches but SatLav is being touted as the first text-based toilet-finder in Britain.  “It’s the first fully managed service that we’re aware of,” British Toilet Association director Richard Chisnell said, praising the council.

“Thank heavens for Westminster’s public toilets,” he said.  George Castanza would be very proud of this service.